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Other Services

Other Services

The U.S. Embassy Lima Consular Section provides a wide range of services for U.S. citizens in Peru.  Services include the issuance of U.S. passports, birth registrations, notaries, and other limited consular services.  Please see the following links for further areas of interest.

  • Employment at the Embassy

    Employment at the Embassy

    • If you are interested in working for the U.S. Embassy in Lima, please view the list of currently available job opportunities.  The U.S. Government is an equal employment opportunity employer, and all applicants will be considered based on their experience and qualifications.

      Pursuant to the requirements of 5 C.F.R. sec. 724.202, ("Notice obligations"), the U.S. Department of State hereby publishes a No FEAR Act Notice.  The purpose of the Notice is to inform Department employees, former employees, and applicants for employment of the rights and protections available under Federal antidiscrimination and whistleblower protection laws.

  • Expat Organizations

    Expat Organizations

  • Holidays and Other Closures

    Holidays and Other Closures

    • Please note that the U.S. Embassy Consular Section is closed for U.S. and Peruvian holidays, as well as the last Wednesday of every month.
  • Legal Information

    Legal Information

    • The Embassy maintains a list of local lawyers (PDF, 170kB) by specialty.  The list is also available in hard copy at the American Citizen Services unit.  It is meant as a guide for people in need of assistance and is not intended as an endorsement or recommendation of any of the listed lawyers.  The Embassy is prohibited from providing legal advice.

      U.S. consular officers are prohibited by federal regulation from serving legal process upon foreign nationals or companies and are not allowed to appoint others to make such service.

      We are required to serve certain forms of legal process, such as subpoenas and show cause orders issued by Federal courts, upon U.S. citizens or permanent residents of the United States who are temporarily abroad, but we may do so only in the limited circumstances indicated by 28 USC 1783 and 1784 (see also Rule 45(e) of the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure).

      Please also see the State Department publications "Arrest or Detention of an American Citizen Abroad" and "Drugs Abroad".

  • Marriage in Peru

    Marriage in Peru

    • Local authorities usually require that single (unmarried, divorced or widowed) U.S. citizens marrying in Peru present a sworn statement (known locally as a Certificado de Soltería) stating that they are legally free to marry in Peru.  This document must be notarized by American Citizen Services at the Embassy.

      Step 1: Click here to download a copy of the Affidavit of Single Status (Certificado de soltería)

      Step 2: Schedule an appointment

      Step 3: Attend the appointment and pay the applicable fee

      • Fee: US$50

      U.S. citizens are also usually required to provide a legalized copy of their birth certificate to local officials, which must be translated into Spanish.  Divorced U.S. citizens will need to present an official copy of their divorce decree.  Please take note that the American Citizens Services Unit can no longer certify or authenticate any vital record.  These records must be certified with an apostille by the Secretary of State of the U.S. state where the document was issued.  Please review the information regarding Notarial Services.  The American Citizen Services Unit does not provide translation services, however you can review the Ministry of Foreign Affairs website for a complete list of official translators.

      Dual citizens who wish to get married using their U.S. citizenship might face additional requirements.  Please note that there are no legal differences in the United States using a marriage certificate that identifies you as a Peruvian citizen, even if you also hold a U.S. citizenship.

      Marriage in Peru is performed according to the Peruvian law, and specific questions on the process should be addressed to a Peruvian attorney or local authorities.  Consular officials cannot perform marriage ceremonies nor can you be married at the U.S. Embassy.
  • Medical Information

    Medical Information

  • Obtaining Vital Records

    Obtaining Vital Records

    • The U.S. federal government does not distribute certificates, files, or indexes with identifying information for vital records. In order to get copies of vital records, such as birth and death certificates issued in the United States, please visit the CDC website.  

      Please take note that the American Citizens Services Unit can no longer certify or authenticate any vital record.  These records must be certified with an apostille by the Secretary of State of the U.S. state where the document was issued.  Please review the information regarding Notarial Services.
  • Peruvian Immigration and Naturalization (Migraciones Peru)

    Peruvian Immigration and Naturalization (Migraciones Peru)

  • Information about Religious Services

    Information about Religious Services

    • The following list includes a variety of religious services in English available in Lima.  It is meant as a guide and is not an endorsement or recommendation of any of the listed religious organizations or services.  Please see the list here (PDF 191 KB).

  • Selective Service Registration

    Selective Service Registration

    • You may register for the Selective Service online.  If you have any problems registering online you can request an appointment with the U.S. Embassy by sending an email to LimaACS@state.gov.  You are required to register with the Selective Service if you are a U.S. citizen male aged 18 to 25.

  • Tax Information

    Tax Information

    • Does the IRS Provide Help in Other Languages? 

      The IRS provides tax information in Chinese, Korean, Russian, Spanish, and Vietnamese.  Go to www.irs.gov and use the drop down box under “Languages” on the upper right corner to select your language. 

      Who Must File?

      If you are a U.S. citizen or resident alien living or traveling outside the United States, you generally are required to file income tax returns, estate tax returns, and gift tax returns, and pay estimated tax in the same way as those residing in the United States.  Your worldwide income is subject to U.S. income tax, regardless of where you reside.

      Your income, filing status, and age determine whether you must file an income tax return.  Generally, you must file a return if your gross income from worldwide sources is at least the amount shown for your filing status in the Filing Requirements table in Chapter 1 of Publication 54, Tax Guide for U.S. Citizens and Resident Aliens Abroad. 

      When is the Federal Tax Return Due?

      The due date is always on or around April 15, but may change from year-to-year due to holidays or other factors. Check the IRS website for this year’s due date. 

      You may qualify for extensions of time to file your tax return, for example:

      There is an automatic two-month extension (on or around June 15) for taxpayers living outside the United States and Puerto Rico.  No form is required; write “Taxpayer Resident Abroad” at the top of your tax return. Caution:  This extension applies only for filing your tax return, not for payment.  If you owe any taxes, you’re required to pay by April 18, 2016.  Interest and penalties generally will be applied if payment is made after this date. 

      Other extensions may be available on IRS.gov. 

      Can I Mail My Return and Payment? 

      You can mail your tax return and payment using the postal service.  Note that U.S. embassies and consulates cannot mail or prepare tax returns on behalf of U.S. taxpayers. You may also use approved private delivery services.  A list of approved delivery services is available on IRS.gov 

      If you mail a return from outside the United States, the date of filing is the postmark date.  However, if you send a payment, separately or with your return, your payment is not considered received until the date of actual receipt.  

      Can I Electronically File My Return? 

      Yes! You can prepare and e-file your income tax return, in many cases for free.  Participating software companies make their products available through the IRS.  Many Free File and e-file partners accept a foreign address.  E-File options are listed on IRS.gov. Even if you do not qualify to file for free, there are other affordable software packages which allow you to file taxes online, and even to have your refund delivered directly and electronically to your U.S. bank account. 

      What Forms Might I Need? 

      How Do I Pay My Taxes? 

      You must pay your taxes in U.S. dollars. 

      Direct pay option.  You can pay online with a direct transfer from your U.S. bank account using Direct Pay, the Electronic Federal Tax Payment System, or by a U.S. debit or credit card.  You also can pay by phone using the Electronic Federal Tax Payment System or by a U.S. debit or credit card. 

      Foreign wire transfers.  If you have a U.S. bank account, you can use:  EFTPS (Electronic Federal Tax Payment System), or Federal Tax Application (same-day wire transfer).  If you do not have a U.S. bank account, ask if your financial institution has a U.S. affiliate that can help you make same-day wire transfers. 

      Foreign electronic payments.  International taxpayers who do not have a U.S. bank account may transfer funds from their foreign bank account directly to the IRS for payment of their tax liabilities.  

      Does the IRS Provide Help in Other Languages? 

      The IRS provides tax information in Chinese, Korean, Russian, Spanish, and Vietnamese.  Go to www.irs.gov and use the drop down box under “Languages” on the upper right corner to select your language. 

      Where Can I Get Help? 

      Contact the International Taxpayer Service Call Center by phone or fax.  The International Call Center is open Monday through Friday, from 6:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. (Eastern Time). 

      Tel: 267-941-1000 (not toll-free)
      Fax: 267-941-1055 

      I Received a Notice from the IRS – What Do I Do? 

      If you receive a notice from the IRS and need to contact the IRS, call the number listed in the notice or the International Taxpayer Service Call Center (contact information is listed in the section above). 

      Where Can I Get More Information? 

      For information, see the IRS website about international taxpayers.

      For general information about international taxpayers, see Publication 54, Taxation of U.S. Citizens and Residents Abroad.

      For information on the Affordable Care Act and taxpayers outside the United States, see Publication 5187, Health Care Law. 

      I Haven’t Filed All My Tax Returns – What Can I Do? 

      If you have not filed all the returns that you should have and want to catch up on your filing obligations, see IRS makes changes to offshore-programs.

  • Official Translator List from Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs

    Official Translator List from Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs

    • The American Citizen Services Unit does not provide translation services.  However, you can review the website for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs for a complete list of official translators.

  • Vaccinations

    Vaccinations

  • Voting Overseas

    Voting Overseas

    • The Federal Voting Assistance Program (FVAP) is responsible for administering the Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting Act.  This Act requires that states and territories allow most U.S. citizens to register and vote absentee in elections for Federal office.

      Important note:  States are no longer required to send ballots automatically to absentee voters during an entire election cycle.  Anyone who wishes to vote in U.S. elections from overseas should send in a new Federal Post Card Application in January of each year. 

      Now all U.S. citizens can receive their blank ballots electronically. Depending on the state in which you are eligible to vote, you may get your ballot by email, fax, or internet download. To start, go to FVAP.gov to complete a new Federal Post Card Application (FPCA), print and sign the form then return it to your local election office in the United States.  We recommend overseas U.S. citizens get in the habit of completing FPCAs each January.  You should include your email address on the form so it is easier for your election officials to reach you if there is a problem.  If your state delivers ballots electronically by fax only, be sure to include your fax number.  If you request electronic delivery and include your email address or fax number, you’ll receive your blank ballot 45 days before general and mid-term elections and generally 30 days before special, primary, and run-off elections for federal offices.  Most states now have voter registration verification websites, and many offer a means of tracking the status of your registration and ballot. 

      For more information and guidance, please follow this link.  If you have questions for the Voting Assistance Officer at the U.S. Embassy in Lima, Peru, please email LimaACS@state.gov.

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